The Apple Of God's Eye

March 8, 2010

The Origin Of Astrology

Astrology is by far the biggest area of popular occult attention. Probably two thirds of books printed on occultism deal with the subject of astrology.

In the 1950’s, only about 100 papers carried horoscope columns. Twenty years later, over 1200 daily newspapers regularly catered to the subject. Statistics claimed that about 10,000 full-time and 175,000 part-time astrologers in the U. S. served some 40,000,000 in their American audience. Another 40 million dabbled in it. Shops carried astrological recordings, calendars, ashtrays, hairstyles, sweat shirts, and thousands of merchandise items linked to the zodiac. Astrology pulp magazines sold millions of copies monthly.

The popular musical Hair with its hit song of Aquarius and its own well-publicized company astrologist gave special impetus to the movement. In 1969 the Dell Publishing Company alone had some 49 horoscope publications in print and sold over 8,000,000 copies of its annual astrological dope sheet.

Today, the number of astrological adherents has increased exponentially. It has been estimated that up to 1 billion people on earth today believe in or follow astrology to some extent. The practice has gained appeal through public endorsement by a wide variety of celebrities who range from Hollywood stars to members of the political and intellectual communities. (more…)

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June 21, 2009

Week Days and Months: Are They Named After Pagan Deities?

Scripture reveals the names and order of Biblical months, however, none of the customary names of months and names of days found in the Gregorian calendar can be found anywhere in the Bible.  On the contrary, a little research shows us that the name of the months and days in the Gregorian calendar are names of pagan sun gods and goddesses.

According to the Encyclopedia International article “Week,” the days of the week are named after the ruling luminary — the days were names for the sun, the moon, and the five visible planets, are represented in the modern Gregorian Calendar week and all are associated with pagan deities.

The names of the days of the week and their meanings are as follows:

Sunday became the first day of the week.

  • Latin: translates from dies solis, or “Day of the Sun”.
  • Roman myth, Apollo was the god of the sun and of healing, so sick people prayed to him. Each day he drove his chariot of fiery horses across the sky to give light to the world.
  • Greek Mythology; Helios was the god of the Sun.
  • Saxon: sunnandaeg – god of the heat and light ball in the sky.

Monday is the second day of the week. Named after the Moon.

  • Roman Myth: Luna, or Diana was goddess of the moon. Diana’s twin brother Apollo was the god of the sun.
  • Saxon: mona – god of the light ball in the night sky, and tide maker.
  • Latin: dies lunae, or “Day of the Moon”.

Tuesday is the third day of the week, named after the planet Mars, in honor of the god Mars.

  • Latin: dies martis or “Day of Mars”. This day is named for the day of Tiw, or Tiu, and old Teutonic (Anglo-Saxon) deity. They also called it Tiw’s day.” So Tuesday” comes from the name of this Saxon god.
  • Roman Myth: Tiu identifies with Tyr, which was the Norse god of war and sky and translated to Mar’s day.
  • Mars: named in honour of the God of War, father of Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome.
  • French: word for Tuesday is Mardi, as in Mardi Gras.

Wednesday is the fourth day of the week and named after the planet Mercury, and later named in honor of the Teutonic god Wedn or Woden.

  • Latin: dies Mercuii, or “Day of Mercury.
  • Old English: spells the word as “Odin” and refers to the planetary god of Roman mythology.
  • Mercury: “the cunning God”, was the god of travelers. He had a winged hat and sandals, so he could fly and carried a staff with two snakes winding round it.

Thursday is the fifth day of the week and corresponds to the planet Jupiter. Later named in honor of the Teutonic god Thor.

  • Latin: dies Jovis, or the day of Jove
  • Norse god: The “Day of Thor”, “the Thunder god”

Jove compares to the Roman planetary god Jupiter, and the Greek god Zeus.

Friday is the sixth day of the week.

  • Norse goddess: Frigg, or Frigga, names that day. Frigg was the wife of Wodin, or Odin, and the goddess of marriage.
  • Latin: dies Veneris, or the day of Venus who was the goddess of love.

Saturday correspond to the planet Saturn, in honor of the Roman god Saturn.

  • Latin: dies Saturni, or the “Day of Saturn”.
  • Roman: The Romans had a mid-winter festival in honor of Saturn, called the Saturnalia. It lasted seven days, and there was much merrymaking. Public business was suspended and schools were closed. Parents gave toys to their children and there was a public banquet.
  • Old father time: god of Time and agriculture and his weapon was a scythe. He ruled the gods before Jupiter.

Sources: Falk, Michael (1999). “Astronomical Names for the Days of the Week”, Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, 93:12

Astronomical

Day Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Luminary & symbol Sun Sun Moon Moon Mars Mars Mercury Mercury Jupiter Jupiter Venus Venus Saturn Saturn
Latin dies solis dies lunea dies martis dies mercurĭi dies jovis deis venĕris dies saturni
Italian domenica (1) lunedì martedì mercoledì giovedì venerdì sabato (2)
Spanish domingo (1) lunes martes miércoles jueves viernes sábado (2)
French dimanche (1) lundi mardi mercredi jeudi vendredi samedi (2)
Welsh dydd Sul dydd Llun dydd Mawrth dydd Mercher dydd Iau dydd Gwener dydd Sadwrn
Old High German sunnuntag mānetag zeistag
Ziu’s day
wodenstag
Woden’s day
donerestag
Donar’s day
friatag
Freia’s day
sambaztag (2)
German Sonntag Montag Dienstag Mittwoch (3) Donnerstag Freitag Samstag (2) or Sonnabend (“sun’s eve”)
Dutch zondag maandag dinsdag woensdag donderdag vrijdag zaterdag
Old Norse sunnundagr
Sunna’s day
mánandagr tysdagr
Tyr’s day
óðensdagr
Odin’s day
þorsdagr
Thor’s day
friádagr
Freya’s day
laugardagr (5)
Swedish Söndag Mândag Tisdag Onsdag Torsdag Fredag Lördag (4)
Finnish sunnuntai maanantai tiistai keskiviikko (3) torstai perjantai lauantai (4)
Old English sunnandaeg
Sunne’s day
mónandaeg tiwesdaeg
Tiw’s day
wodnesdaeg
Woden’s day
þunresdaeg
Thunor’s day
frigesdaeg
Frige’s day
saeternesdaeg
English Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Luminary & symbol Sun Sun Moon Moon Mars Mars Mercury Mercury Jupiter Jupiter Venus Venus Saturn Saturn
Day Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

Source for graph.

But how did this planetary week come to be so commonly used in the professing Christian world? Hutton Webster, in his book “Rest Days,” provides the answer: “The early Christians had at first adopted the Jewish seven-day week with its NUMBERED weekdays, but by the close of the third century A.D. this began to give way to the planetary week …. The use of planetary names by Christians attests the growing influence of astrological speculations introduced by converts from paganism …. Thus, gradually a PAGAN INSTITUTION was engrafted on Christianity.” (Emphasis added. See pages
220-221).

This planetary week with its days named after pagan deities is not of God. God Almighty DID CREATE the week with seven days. But He merely numbered the days one through seven (Gen. 1; 2:1-3). The only day He named was the seventh day. He called that day “Sabbath” (Ex. 16:22-26; 20:8-11).

The names of the worldly months and their meanings are as follows:

Month                                                        From the Latin:

JANUARY                                                  Januarius, in honor of the Roman god Janus.
FEBRUARY                                                Februarius, in honor of the Roman festival of general expiation and purification.
MARCH                                                        Martius, in honor of the Roman god Mars.
APRIL                                                          Aprilis, which was derived from APERIO, a Latin verb meaning to open. So called
because it is the month when the earth opens to produce new fruits.
MAY                                                             Maius, in honor of the Greek goddess Maia.
JUNE                                                            Junius, in honor of the Roman goddess Juno.
JULY                                                           Julius, in honor of Roman emperor Julius Caesar.
AUGUST                                                     Augustus, in honor of Roman emperor Augustus Caesar.

The rest of the months — September, October, November, December — are derived from the Latin words for the numerals 7, 8, 9, and 10. They were the 7th, 8th, 9th, and 10th months of the old Roman calendar.

May 31, 2009

The Universe: Evolution Or The Work Of God’s Fingers?

antifan-real.deviantart.com

Whenever we read about evolution, it’s usually preceded by the word theory. A theory, according to Webster’s, is described as “speculation, an idea, hypothesis or a scheme.” A theory then is an unproven statement.

Darwin’s theory of evolution teaches that the first life upon the earth came by “spontaneous generation,” or by “electrochemical action,” or some unknown process millions of years ago in the warm ocean slime. Thus it is the theory of evolution that life sprang out of dead matter, or that the living came from the non-living.

Now probability is the mathematics of chance, and therefore probability should have a great deal to do with evolution.
Given a monkey, a typewriter and a stack of paper, by chance alone, words, sentences, even whole books could be written, right? This is a doctrine deemed holy by a not-insignificant number of educated men in the biological and geological sciences today. (more…)

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